Tag Archives: inspiration

The Secret Ingredients To Being a Successful Muslimah

Success is something I have been thinking about a great deal lately. One of the first questions that come to mind is how we define success? One of the inner-most desires we can have as human beings is to be successful at something. Whether it’s our role as a student or in our profession or even as a mother.
As Muslims, we can all too often get dragged into this type of worldly measure of success which measures you by material achievements- but in all honesty, how many of those people chasing after solely worldly goods are truly happy? I’m not suggesting we shouldn’t have all the above as Muslims. Indeed we should, but our measure of success should be linked to something lasting, more rewarding, more satisfying than reaching the status quo.
Successful indeed are the believers (Surah Al-Muminun)
1. Have sincere intentions:
Success begins on the sincerity of our intentions. We should seek to have a lasting benefit from whatever we have set our minds to achieve, whether it is studying at university, getting a career or starting a family. Our success in what we intend to do will depend on how sincere we are in our efforts to please Allah.
2. Invest time wisely:
One of the top traits of successful leaders as research as shown is that they manage their time effectively. Quit wasting time on things that do not bring you benefit and watch your life become full of blessings.
3 Develop yourself:
We have access to knowledge, courses, books and so much more, so anyone can develop their knowledge and grow in an area of interest. As Muslims, it is essential we improve our knowledge of the religion and excel at what we do so that we can be an example and role model.
4. Keep learning:
One of the striking features I have found in successful people is their humility and their continued pursuit of learning, not only in the field they are currently in but also in general.
5. Make du’a:
The final but one of the most powerful ingredients to success is to make dua and lots of it. Indeed my success only comes from Allah is a beautiful dua to ponder over often as it reminds me that we can never become too arrogant in life about our achievements. If it wasn’t for our creator, we would not be able to exist in the first place let alone succeed at what we set out to do.
Remember to always remain humble in your achievements and constantly thank Allah for helping you.
After all, we won’t know if we’ve really succeeded until we reach the gates of Jannah. May Allah (SWT) make us amongst those who are the successful in this life and the hereafter.

Culled from Sisters Magazine issue 53.

Outspoken: The Power of a Woman’s Voice

Muslim women should be seen, not heard” is a belief that – if not spoken outright – is implicitly understood and reinforced constantly. “A woman’s voice is ‘awrah” is another catchphrase that is floated around commonly and used to shame Muslim women who stand up for themselves in any way. “Women who speak are fitnah!”
If anything, one common trait amongst all the wives of RasulAllah (SAW) – besides being of those who were guaranteed Jannah – was that, in their own way, they were incredibly strong women who were never afraid to stand up for themselves or to speak out. Juwayriyyah bint al-Haarith (RA) was the daughter of an Arab chieftain – making her, in essence, a princess of sorts. When her father’s tribe waged war against the Muslims and were defeated, they captured prisoners and spoils of war as was customary at the time. Amongst the prisoners was Juwayriyyah (RA), who was the prisoner of Thaabit ibn Qays. Despite the fact that Juwayriyyah’s husband had just been killed in battle, rendering her a widow and captive, she was nonetheless both courageous and intelligent. She immediately began to arrange her own ransom, reaching an agreement with Thaabit that she would ransom herself for nine measures of silver.
She also arranged it so that she was given a meeting with Rasool Allah (SAW). With her head held high and her dignity undiminished by her circumstances, she addressed him with an eloquent and powerful speech:
“O Messenger of Allah! I am Juwayriyyah, the daughter of al-Haarith, the leader of his people. You are not unaware of what has befallen me. I am a captive of Thaabit ibn Qays, and I have bargained with him to ransom myself for nine measures of silver – so help me to free myself!”
In these brief words, Juwayriyyah (RA) established herself as a woman of intelligence, dignity and of faith. Her very first words made it clear that she had accepted Islam – why else would she refer to him as the Messenger of Allah? – and called attention to her situation by emphasising her former position as the daughter of a leader, and her current position as a prisoner. She made it known that she was not helpless and idle and would not allow herself to remain a prisoner. This not only ensured that everyone present was aware of the fact that she had taken pro-active measures, but also called upon Rasool Allah’s sense of honour, compassion and generosity to assist her.
Indeed, this small speech was all it took to guarantee freedom not only for herself, but also for her entire tribe. Rasool Allah (SAW) was so impressed by her that he immediately told her, “Would you like something better than that?”
Quick-witted as ever, Juwayriyyah (RA) didn’t simply accept, but rather asked, “What is it?”
Rasool Allah (SAW) said, “I will pay your ransom and marry you as well.”
Her answer was swift. “Yes, O Messenger of Allah!”
And with that, she was included amongst the ranks of the Mothers of the Believers. Not only that, but due to her acceptance of Islam and her position as the wife of Rasool Allah (SAW), she also secured the freedom of her entire tribe, as well as bringing them closer to Islam. The power of her words – of her voice – was clear.
Unfortunately, it’s common today in many Muslim cultures and communities to find that women who speak up, whether in defence of themselves or for a specific cause, are penalised for voicing themselves. Their modesty, their piety and even their personal lives are often targeted, sometimes with crude insinuations made. It is appalling that these accusations are thrown around at women who are doing little more than following in the footsteps of the heroines of Islam – the wives and daughters of Rasool Allah (RA), his female Companions and the great female scholars of the Tabi’een.
In a time when the Muslim Ummah is besieged on numerous fronts – militarily, economically and socially – the example of Juwayriyyah (RA) is one to be told to every Muslim man and woman, reminding us that no matter what situations we find ourselves in, Allah I helps those who help themselves. In Juwayriyyah’s case, it was her pro-activeness, her quick mind and her courage that changed her from not only prisoner to princess, but also into a woman of Jannah. By modelling ourselves on Juwayriyyah (RA), we will discover that one of the greatest tools for changing our less-than-ideal circumstances is complete trust in Allah I while never backing down from the numerous obstacles that will inevitably be in our paths.
Indeed, Allah will not change the condition of a people until they change what is in themselves. (Ar-Ra’d:11)

Zainab bint Younus (AnonyMouse) is a young woman who finds constant inspiration in the lives of the Sahabiyaat and other great women in Islamic history. She hopes that every Muslimah is able to identify with the struggles of these inspirational women and follow in their footsteps to become a part of a new generation of powerful Muslim women.

http://www.sisters-magazine.com/2015/11/05/outspoken-the-power-of-a-womans-voice/

How Did They Do It?

Were they ever tempted?
Did they ever fall short?
Did they ever wonder and doubt?
Why is my faith so weak?

Did their women all wear Niqab?
Did they all achieve their goals?
Was the world any better?
Or were they just simply better?

Were they ever frightened by the might of the enemy?
Or were they ever scared of speaking the truth?
Were they this victimized?
Were they superhuman?

Were they very much and felt outnumbered?
Did they dispute amongst themselves often as we do?
Were they united?
Did they all have a common goal?

What did they do for leisure?
Was it sports, music, poetry or folklore?
Did they have more than a day and night?
How come they did achieve so much?
How come 24hrs seems so short?

I’m going crazy here,
How did the Sahabas do it?
Where did we go wrong?
Questions begging for sincere answers

Do you know the answers?

Note:
Niqab: Veil
Sahabas: Companions of the Prophet (SAW)

Author: Sino